Maximize Linux Laptop’s Battery Life

 

Check if Your Battery Needs to Be Replaced

For example, on Ubuntu, you can open the Power Statistics application from the Dash. Look at the “Laptop battery” section. “Energy when full” is how much power your battery can currently store when it’s fully charged. “Energy (design)” is how much power your battery could originally store when it’s fully charged.
 
 

Divide “Energy when full” by “Energy (design)”, multiple the result by 100, and you’ll get a percentage. For example, in the screenshot below, we’d do the following math:

(44.8 / 54.3) * 100 = 82.5%

This means the battery currently holds 82.5% of its original capacity. That’s not too bad. You won’t be at 100% unless you just purchased a new laptop. But if it’s low—under 50%, for example—and you aren’t getting much time out of your battery, you may just need to replace the battery.

— OR —

Divide “Energy when full” by “Energy (design)”, multiple the result by 100, and you’ll get a percentage. For example, in the screenshot below, we’d do the following math:

(44.8 / 54.3) * 100 = 82.5%

This means the battery currently holds 82.5% of its original capacity. That’s not too bad. You won’t be at 100% unless you just purchased a new laptop. But if it’s low—under 50%, for example—and you aren’t getting much time out of your battery, you may just need to replace the battery.

 
 

Advanced Battery-Saving Utilities

Intel’s open-source PowerTOP utility will examine your system and see how well various power-saving features are enabled, even providing some suggestions for how to reduce your system’s power consumption. It’s a command-line tool, so you’ll need to run it from there. You’ll usually find it in your Linux distribution’s software repositories.

For example, to install and run PowerTOP on Ubuntu, you’d open a Terminal window and run the following commands:

sudo apt install powertop

sudo powertop --calibrate
Try to write 'powertop –auto-tune' before the exit directive in /etc/rc.local. You will need the administrative permission to modify the file (here with GEdit):
sudo apt install powertop
gksu gedit /etc/rc.local

i've just edited the file:

#!/bin/sh -e
#
# rc.local
#
# This script is executed at the end of each multiuser runlevel.
# Make sure that the script will "exit 0" on success or any other
# value on error.
#
# In order to enable or disable this script just change the execution
# bits.
#
# By default this script does nothing.
/usr/sbin/powertop –auto-tune

exit 0

sudo chmod +x /etc/rc.local

For example, TLP will more aggressively suspend USB devices, park your hard drive’s heads, and throttle your CPU. These may not be ideal tweaks if you already have solid battery life on your Linux laptop, but they may be helpful if you’re struggling to squeeze more battery time out of your system.

sudo apt install tlp

You can then restart your system and TLP will automatically start at each boot. To avoid restarting immediately, you can launch it by running:

sudo tlp start

 

Credits

Link 1 | Link 2